The use of economic imbalance in john steinbecks novel the grapes of wrath

The Multiplying Effects of Selfishness and Altruism According to Steinbeck, many of the evils that plague the Joad family and the migrants stem from selfishness. Ma gets pleasure out of chiding Pa; for her, an angry man is an undefeated man.

Behind the harrows, the long seeders—twelve curved iron penes erected in the foundry, orgasms set by gears, raping methodically, raping without passion.

Ma and the children only observe and try to keep the men from breaking down due to stress. This merging takes place among the migrant community in general as well: Aware that their livelihood and survival depend upon their devotion to the collective good, the migrants unite—sharing their dreams as well as their burdens—in order to survive.

The novel draws a simple line through the population—one that divides the privileged from the poor—and identifies that division as the primary source of evil and suffering in the world. While the state does not suffer the same weather-related problems as Oklahoma, industrial agriculture has resulted in only a select few owning land, leaving smaller farmers displaced and migrants expecting work.

The men who own the land there hold the power, and attempt to control supply and demand so that they can get away with paying poor wages. From struggling to find work and feed the members of their family, to losing loved ones and relying on others for survival, Steinbeck poignantly captures the feelings and experiences of migrant workers during the Depression.

Eventually, perhaps a thousand people would come for a job that required only two hundred workers. Steinbeck chronicles the difficulties that farming families such as the Joads experienced during the Dust Bowl, as big banks foreclosed on their once prosperous land, leaving families displaced and homeless.

Although the Joads are joined by blood, the text argues that it is not their genetics but their loyalty and commitment to one another that establishes their true kinship.

The land gives them an identity, a past and a future. If people in Hooverville did not cooperate when contractors who often conducted their searches for workers illegally arrived to hire people, Steinbeck described what would happen. Mae, a waitress, sells bread and sweets to a man and his sons for drastically reduced prices.

Steinbeck endeavored to speak out Several intercalary chapters explain the fear that the California landowners feel over the influx of workers. Throughout the novel, Steinbeck constantly emphasizes self-interest and altruism as equal and opposite powers, evenly matched in their conflict with each other.

Simple self-interest motivates the landowners and businessmen to sustain a system that sinks thousands of families into poverty. She exerts her newfound power by threatening Pa with a jack handle when he and Tom propose that the family split up after the car breaks down: Then, after a brief expository chapter, the Joads immediately happen upon an instance of kindness as similarly self-propagating: Historical, social, and economic circumstances separate people into rich and poor, landowner and tenant, and the people in the dominant roles struggle viciously to preserve their positions.

Steinbeck depicts industrialization as a sexual force, replacing the loving hands of a farmer with the roughness of a beast: Ads for workers ultimately drew three hundred thousand people to California looking for work during the disastrous economic times of the Great Depression of the s.

Grampa has passed this responsibility to Pa, who presides over a kind of council with the other men. The driver sat in his iron seat and he was proud of the straight lines he did not will, proud of the tractor he did not own or love, proud of the power he could not control.

This cycle gets interrupted when people from the Dust Bowl begin to move west looking for work.Get an answer for 'How does John Steinbeck use social realism in The Grapes of Wrath?' and find homework help for other The Grapes of Wrath questions at eNotes.

Covers John Steinbecks Pulitzer Prize--winning novel The Grapes Of Wrath.

How does John Steinbeck use social realism in The Grapes of Wrath?

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title. A summary of Themes in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Grapes of Wrath and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The novel draws a simple line through the population—one that divides the privileged from. This lesson will examine several aspects of significant language in John Steinbeck's novel, ''The Grapes of Wrath'', and will provide examples.

Steinbeck puts class discrimination on display in The Grapes of Wrath, focusing on the economic situation of the migrant people as compared to that of the landowners.

Steinbeck in the Schools

Several intercalary chapters explain the fear that the California landowners feel over the influx of workers. The Grapes of Wrath as Proletarian Novel.

In the roads where the teams moved, where the wheels milled the ground and the hooves of the horses beat the ground, the dirt crust broke and the dust formed.

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The use of economic imbalance in john steinbecks novel the grapes of wrath
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